wielenga

Wielenga, C., Bae, B. B., Dahlmanns, E., Matshaka, C., Matsimbe, Z. & Murambadoro, R. 2018. Women in the Context of Justice: Continuities and Discontinuities in Southern Africa.

This Handbook builds on the work of a longer term project on justice and governance practices at community level during periods of transition.  This project is particularly interested in the burgeoning endeavour to incorporate community justice practices into transitional justice interventions after mass violence. One of the issues identified is that there seems to be a knee-jerk reaction to community justice practices, including the response that such practices are ‘patriarchal’ and ‘gender-biased’, and thus that they need to be abolished.

 


Mfecane

Mfecane, S. 2018. (Un)knowing MEN: Africanising gender justice programmes for men in South Africa.

In (Un)knowing Men Sakhumzi Mfecane shares his critical reflections on research on men and masculinities in South Africa. In South Africa, he argues, there seems to be an impasse in scholarly accounts of men and masculinities. Old theories do not provide new answers; violence against women, homicide, rape of women and children, and homophobia persist despite heavy financial investments by the government and international NGOs in research, education and activism that seek to end all forms of gender inequality in South Africa. Research and interventions, Mfecane points out, centre on the same goal of subverting patriarchy without putting patriarchy in proper social and historical context.

 


flagging adherence

Lazarus, R. 2017. Flagging Adherence: social and structural realities of adult ART adherence in South Africa.

Although South Africa has the largest cohort worldwide initiated onto ART, we need to ask whether adequate attention has been given to ensuring long-term adherence to treatment. If the South African ART programme is to achieve the declared goal of the South African National Department of Health (i.e. to end the HIV epidemic by 2030), then – poor adherence to ART – must be recognised and addressed. The focus of this monograph is primarily on how social and structural factors shape and sustain the HIV epidemic, including their influence on adherence, and the implication of this for promoting adherence. We argue that dominant ways of thinking about adherence may themselves be problematic and we suggest alternative approaches.

 


gender-based justice

Crewe, M., Burns, C., Kruger, C. & Maritz, J. 2017. Gender-based Justice: Reflections on social justice and social change.

This monograph is a foundation document to enable discussion about: (i) the history of attempts to bring equity and justice to the fore; (ii) gender, including how the concept has evolved; and (iii) how, despite the fact that we can and do inhabit so many different identities, the fundamental issue is still one of patriarchy and the gender oppression of women and people with alternative sexualities, rising from the desire to make people conform to an overarching gender belonging. In future monographs we will explore how we will work with partners to address gender-based justice and the kinds of interventions that are possible to shift our gender perspectives and how we view violence.

 


CSA&G. 2017. Policy Brief – Thinking out of the box: sexualities, gender and HIV.

 Thinking out of the box: sexualities, gender and HIV is one of series of ‘Policy Briefs’ developed by the CSA&G The aim of these policy briefs is to expand briefly on a core topic area relevant to the intersections between HIV and AIDS, gender, gender-based violence and sexualities, providing the reader with a brief background, an examination of key issues and setting out challenges for those working in the field.

 

 


CSA&G. 2017. Policy Brief – Power matters: understanding GBV.

Power matters: understanding GBV is one of series of ‘Policy Briefs’ developed by the CSA&G The aim of these policy briefs is to expand briefly on a core topic area relevant to the intersections between HIV and AIDS, gender, gender-based violence and sexualities, providing the reader with a brief background, an examination of key issues and setting out challenges for those working in the field.

 

 


interctionalitiesCSA&G. 2017. Policy Brief – The Strongest Link: advantages of an intersectional approach

The Strongest Link: advantages of an intersectional approach is one of series of ‘Policy Briefs’ developed by the CSA&G The aim of these policy briefs is to expand briefly on a core topic area relevant to the intersections between HIV and AIDS, gender, gender-based violence and sexualities, providing the reader with a brief background, an examination of key issues and setting out challenges for those working in the field.

 

 


CSA&G. 2017. Policy Brief – Social Justice and gender inequality 

Social Justice and gender inequality is one of series of ‘Policy Briefs’ developed by the CSA&G The aim of these policy briefs is to expand briefly on a core topic area relevant to the intersections between HIV and AIDS, gender, gender-based violence and sexualities, providing the reader with a brief background, an examination of key issues and setting out challenges for those working in the field.

 

 


CSA&G. 2017. Policy Brief – Halting HIV: strategies and approaches

Halting HIV: strategies and approaches is one of series of ‘Policy Briefs’ developed by the CSA&G The aim of these policy briefs is to expand briefly on a core topic area relevant to the intersections between HIV and AIDS, gender, gender-based violence and sexualities, providing the reader with a brief background, an examination of key issues and setting out challenges for those working in the field.

 

 


Moletsane, R. 2014. Nostalgia. AIDS Review 2013. Series Editor: Crewe, M.

Edward Thompson, writing about British rule in India, says that as the colonisers of India the British had been insensitive not only regarding the harm which they had done to Indians but also about the harm that the representations of that relationship had done to them. That is to say, he said, if we continue to represent them (i.e. Indians) as savages, as violent, as barbarians in need of disciplining and education, we are going to hurt them because we have produced a psychological hurt which far from being resolved by power, or by understanding in a general sense, is going to be increased. Nostalgia is concerned with precisely those representations with which we are confronted in our work in HIV and AIDS, in development studies, in the reports of donors and of those who have undertaken research, and by people who have responded to being the subjects of research.

 


Stadler, J. & Saethre, E. 2012. Off Label. AIDS Review 2012. Series Editor: Crewe, M.

In this Review – Off Label – the experience of participants in a microbicide trial is analysed, operating from the idea that “as condoms and gels are employed (or not employed) in people’s everyday lives, these technologies acquire their own unique signification. In some cases, these meanings could be quite different to those intended by health care profession­als” (p20). These meanings and explanations are ‘off label’ in that while the health care professionals believe that the ways in which a trial will unfold and be experienced is based on how well the professionals understand the trial and the participants, it is the participants who take the intervention, interpret it, transform it, accept or reject it. Participants use trials to re-define themselves as knowledgeable participants, and to assert their individuality and choice.

 


McNeill, F.G. & Niehaus, I. 2009. Magic. AIDS Review 2009. Series Editor: Crewe, M.

Magic looks at one of the consequences of testing: treatment and access to treatment. No one would deny that all individuals who wish to should have access to testing and then, if they qualify, access to treatment. However, what is at issue is the manner in which testing and treatment are framed and thereby understood. How do individuals understand the HIV test, its implications and its complex relationship to people’s lives, to communities and to society? What informs whether or not individuals decide to test? How do they understand treatment, how drugs work, dosages and side-effects? Magic challenges the all-too-easy assumption that testing and treatment ‘normalises’ the disease and reduces HIV and AIDS-related stigma. Magic seeks to address the influences in people’s lives that affect their response to antiretroviral treatments, i.e. what drives adherence or treatment failure?

 


Rickard, K. 2008. Balancing Acts. Series Editor: Crewe, M.

Kevin de Cock writing in his comment in The Lancet in 2002, entitled ‘Shadow on the continent’ said that how an issue is defined strongly affects how it is addressed. Portrayal of HIV/AIDS against a background of either human rights, poverty, gender or public health elicits different responses, but the measure of each response must be its ability to curtail the epidemic, and at what social cost. In essence this is what this Review is about. How do we best understand what works, how do we estimate and measure the social cost, quite apart from the economic and political costs, and how do we strike the balance between the imperatives of public health on the one hand and the imperatives of human rights on the other?

 


(Un)Real AIDS Review 2004

Kometsi, K. 2004. (Un)Real. AIDS Review 2004. Series Editor: Crewe, M.

(Un)Real addresses the ways in which the HIV and AIDS epidemic has positioned men and the crucial roles that men can play in the social and political responses to HIV and AIDS. We address the construction of male identities and ‘maleness’ and the ways in which mascu­linities and male sexuality has been understood. For too long ‘gender’ has looked mainly at the position of women in society, addressing women and young girls in ways that position them negatively in relation to the rest of society through descriptions of vulnerability, of powerlessness and of being oppressed by men who have been placed centrally as the major problem in HIV and AIDS. This approach to gender has ensured that the many voices of men have been silenced and that men have been seen as being central to the problem but on the margins of solutions and of social, political and personal behaviour change.